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Talking to Cancer Patients/survivors

July 29, 2013 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

This post send by Hannah Cudby

Hi, I am doing a project on how teenagers deal and cope with cancer, I was wondering if there is any way for me to contact people like this or not? I would really like to talk to cancer patients to get a insight of what happens and how they deal with it.
Thank you
Hannah Cudby

Talking

July 20, 2013 by  
Filed under Community

This post send by Mafe

I really don\’t know what you\’re going through but if you want to talk I\’d love to listen to you. We can talk about anything so yeah if you want Email: Lovelyf15@hotmail.com Bye x ☺

How to Cope when a family member has Hodgkins Lymphoma

July 19, 2013 by  
Filed under Friends and Family

This post send by Sarah

Hi There!

I am a 22 year old female, but I am going to share the story of my 14 year old closest cousin. This may help you, as a cancer patient; or it may help anyone who has someone close to them that has been touched by cancer.

It was in March 2012 when my cousin found a small bump on her chest. The bump was hard and very painful. After X-rays were complete, the doctors assured her and her family that it was nothing to be concerned about.

She continued life as normal.

In December 2012, my cousin began experiencing extreme pain in her knee. She would wake up crying at night, and had even had a hard time walking. She was in so much pain that she was not able to eat – she lost 15 pounds!

By the end of January, the doctor\’s had realized the first bump on my cousins chest, was a cancerous tumour. It had spread to her leg, where a tumour developed and spread across her whole thigh (femur). The doctor\’s originally though my cousin would be diagnosed with a Sarcoma, a form of bone cancer.Her prognosis was not good.

After her biopsy, the doctor\’s realized that my cousin had Hodgkins Lymphoma. She had a very aggressive form of lymphoma, and needed intensive chemotherapy.

When our family found out that my cousin had cancer, we all felt a whirlwind of emotions. Her father would not leave his room- he was even getting sick to his stomach. Her mother had to put on a strong and smiling face to make sure my cousin and her siblings were not scared. My whole family put a strong face on for my cousin, but when we were alone – we would break down and cry our eyes out.

My cousin would have to spend 6 months as an inpatient in the hospital, because her chemotherapy made her at such high risk from infection, she was not allowed to go outside at the hospital or anything.

The night before my cousin was admitted, we spent the night hanging out at her house. She told me how scared she was to go into the hospital, she was so scared of the side effects of chemotherapy.

The doctor\’s warned us that she was going to get extremely ill and her hair would fall out very quickly.

As my cousin started chemotherapy, we waited… and waited.. and waited for her to begin getting very sick.
It did not happen! My cousin was on chemotherapy 24 hours a day for a few days, and then and then had chemoterapy every 12 hours. As soon as her counts were back up, they would start chemotherapy again.
My cousin did not throw up ONCE during her whole treatment. She became tired and would often have head aches, but she did not experience many common side effects of chemotherapy. She lost her hair around 2 months in.

After 3 months of chemotherapy, my cousins cancer was completely gone. She has now been in remission for almost 3 months.

Throughout the entire experience, my cousin was so strong and so positive – I truley believe that this is why she recovered so fast.

I remember talking to her about her hair falling out. I asked her if she was nervous.

She said, \"Well I can\’t do anything about it, I am not going to sit and cry about it\"

She has truly been an inspiration to me. With 8 years between us, I have learned SO much from her.

When you or someone you know is going through treatment, it is so important to find strength from those around you. Stay strong, and remain positive!

We are in a day and age, where anything is possible! Cancer treatment has advanced SO much, and there are a lot of ways to manage the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation!

When I first found out my cousin was diagnosed, I could not bare to see her. All I would do is cry.

When I finally built up the courage to face her, I felt SO much better. She brought out a strength in me I never though I had. We spent almost every day in the hospital together and became SO close.

There were many times throughout the journey where members of my family would break down, that is normal. It felt good for them to let their emotions out.

Although you might not be the one experiencing cancer, it is okay to feel upset, mad, or anxious. It is a compeltely normal way to react!

The journey that I have experienced over the past year has changed my way of life, I am now an employee at a local cancer centre, and spend time volunteering with cancer patients. I have found meaning in what happened to my cousin, and i love her so much!

I hope that those of you suffering can do the same.

If anybody would like advice, or simply would like to talk, please reply to this message.

wanting to talk

July 16, 2013 by  
Filed under Community

This post send by Mariah voycik

I just want to talk and make someone smile who usually don\’t I don\’t no what your going through , but I am very supportive and like to make new friends , I am 15 and I don\’t know anybody with cancer but I do still care . So I researched a way to get to no someone and help someone with there problems and put a smile on your face. Im very funny and understanding. If you\’d like to talk please contact me by Facebook preferably , Mariah voycik. Or by email mariahvoycik@gmail.com. Thank you and god bless

wanting to talk

July 16, 2013 by  
Filed under Community

This post send by Mariah voycik

I just want to talk and make someone smile who usually don\’t

My Dad

June 18, 2013 by  
Filed under Friends and Family

This post send by Megan

I\\\’m 16 years old.I was in the 7th grade when my dad was first diagnosed with Bile Duct cancer. It was the worst thing ever. Last summer he stared not feeling good again, loosing weight, loss of appetite, tired all the time and his skin had a yellow tint. Went to the doctors many of times. They said it came back and the only thing left to do was chemotherapy which would only make him live longer. The chemo was working for a while. My last day of school for summer I get the worst results ever. The chemo quit working. The cancer has spread to many lympode nodes. There\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’s only one chemo left to try he starts it tomorrow. All I do is cry.

My Dad

June 18, 2013 by  
Filed under Friends and Family

This post send by Megan

I\’m 16 years old.I was in the 7th grade when my dad was first diagnosed with Bile Duct cancer. It was the worst thing ever. Last summer he stared not feeling good again, loosing weight, loss of appetite, tired all the time and his skin had a yellow tint. Went to the doctors many of times. They said it came back and the only thing left to do was chemotherapy which would only make him live longer. The chemo was working for a while. My last day of school for summer I get the worst results ever. The chemo quit working. The cancer has spread to many lympode nodes. There\\\\\\\’s only one chemo left to try he starts it tomorrow. All I do is cry.

Hair loss

June 16, 2013 by  
Filed under Side Effects

This post send by Rachael

In the span of about a month and a half I lost most of my hair. As I watched it fall out I put off shaving my head because I did not want to have no hair. Big mistake. If I could do it over again I would just shave it all off before the hair loss started. By the end I was starting to question my sanity as I cried myself to sleep every night, and cried every morning as I saw my pillow covered with hair. The bottom line? I can get used to having no hair but nothing could be more gross then rolling over and getting a mouth full of hair.

so far so good

May 31, 2013 by  
Filed under Community

This post send by Ethan Mobley

well I\\\’m finished with therapy for the 16 days. Having a hard time when I want to leave the wrap off from my surgery to remove my bone cancer in the leg. I keep thinking people will be disturbed about it or not talk to me… so what do yall think,should I just try it for one day and see what happens?

What a journey

May 29, 2013 by  
Filed under Survivor Stories

This post send by brittany

September 11th, 2012 was probably the scariest day of m my entire life. It was the day i was diagnosed with synovial sarcoma, a rare type of bone cancer found in kids. Although it hasnt been that long, i feel like i\’ve been dealing with it forever. I had to undergo chemo, radiation AND surgery. Chemo for me wasnt even the worst part. The surgery was. I finally finished chemo and had my surgery January 3rd of 2013.They had to take a huge piece of my femur(thigh) bone out and i now have metal and a 10 inch scar.I\’m doing a lot better with getting around. No more wheel chair.Just crutches. I shopuld be getting my port out soon. And when i thought i was done, i fell yesterday on my leg and i am back in the hospital because of pain management. Its a never ending rollercoaster and i wanna get off.

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